Lectures: to capture or not capture?

My colleague Katherine Haxton has recently published an interesting post on the recording of lectures. This has led me to think about what I do, whether it is working, and whether I could do more. Thinking about this now is well timed, since we resume teaching tomorrow, after our Autumn Semester exam period finished on Friday.

I have been recording the audio component of my lectures for four years now. My thinking has been that, with having the audio and the lecture slides, the students can (if they wish) reproduce most of what happened in the lecture to help their revision. No, it’s not the kind of full capture that Katherine does, and yes, any work done on the whiteboard is missed. But since I don’t tend to use selective release (i.e. I make the recordings available to all, regardless of attendance), there has to be some benefit for actually attending, and I haven’t (so far) worried too much about the part of the lecture that will be missed by those who are absent. After all, it’s still possible to borrow notes!

I haven’t done extensive research into how much the recordings are accessed – the information is there on Blackboard, and I must make an effort to look at it. But judging from comments on module questionnaires, and informal feedback, the recordings are appreciated.

Could I/should I do more? I have recently bought a Microsoft Surface tablet, and could (in principle) use that in my lectures, so that any examples, etc. are captured, by writing on its screen instead of the whiteboard. I am considering doing that, although there are some annoying minor technical issues to be overcome first, like getting an adaptor cable to connect the tablet to the data projector! On the other hand, my more mathematical examples are easier to explain with the extra space of the whiteboard (always assuming the room I’m in has one, which is by no means guaranteed!) I do make screencasts, usually on topics which require more detailed explanation, and there I use Camtasia, which works well. But it is time consuming, as Katherine says.

So, for now, I will continue what I’ve been doing. If my university decides to invest in lecture capture facilities, it will be interesting to see what route/procedure they follow. If anyone has experience of this kind of ‘centralised lecture capture’, it would be interesting to hear of their experiences, whether good or bad!

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